14 Replies Latest reply: Sep 15, 2013 4:37 AM by maccabi RSS

Withouth Oxygen in Space would we see muzzle flash?

rise_up44

I understand doing certain things for impact and visual effect but I am curious from what I have read and heard if you fired a gun in space because of the lack of oxygen you would not see a muzzle flash like in this new Campaign trailer. To me it does not matter either way because it looks really cool but I am actually pretty curious from a scientific point of view if in fact you would or would not be able to see this and also how the gravity in space and other aspects would effect a fire battle in space. Please add your thoughts and follow me on twitter

  • Re: Withouth Oxygen in Space would we see muzzle flash?
    JediMasterYoda

    First off you wouldn't be able to use conventional weaponry in space because of the gravitational forces of space itself. The only weapons that could be used in space are energy lasers and beam weapons. By looking at the trailer already Call of Duty ****** up that realization.

    • Re: Withouth Oxygen in Space would we see muzzle flash?
      maccabi

      JediMasterYoda wrote:

       

      First off you wouldn't be able to use conventional weaponry in space because of the gravitational forces of space itself. The only weapons that could be used in space are energy lasers and beam weapons. By looking at the trailer already Call of Duty ****** up that realization.

      Total codswallop ,

      You can use conventional guns quite easily , as for gravitional forces how do you explain how satelites and the ISS stays up in space??

      • Re: Withouth Oxygen in Space would we see muzzle flash?
        thebigb82

        *puts on science hat*

         

        the iss and other objects in earth orbit are held in place by rockets, its speed my dear watson, speed, faster is goes, earths gravity doesn't count.

         

        As for the question of firing a conventional weapon in space, actually it will work, modern bullets have some oxyen inside them, when the hammer from the trigger hits the bullet it explodes, regardless of the vaccum of space.

         

        *removes hat*

        • Re: Withouth Oxygen in Space would we see muzzle flash?
          maccabi

          thebigb82 wrote:

           

          *puts on science hat*

           

          the iss and other objects in earth orbit are held in place by rockets, its speed my dear watson, speed, faster is goes, earths gravity doesn't count.

           

          As for the question of firing a conventional weapon in space, actually it will work, modern bullets have some oxyen inside them, when the hammer from the trigger hits the bullet it explodes, regardless of the vaccum of space.

           

          *removes hat*

          Actually gravity plays a large part in keeping satellites up, between that and velocity it's the balance of these two things that keep things in orbit not rockets. The only time rockets are ever used is to correct or change course/position of a satellite. Satellites are pulled towards earth by gravity , the earth is a sphere and rough math here it curves roughly 5m for every 8km traveled, so as long as the object you want to keep in orbit exceeds this speed it wont ever fall to earth. Depending at what hieght and where you launch a satellite from you can get them to do funky things like stay in geostantionary orbits for example which is done by having  the satellite in an orbit of just over 35km at this height it matches the rotation of the earth.

           

          Modern bullets don't have oxygen inside then, they have an oxidizing agent in the powder

    • Re: Withouth Oxygen in Space would we see muzzle flash?
      Izjar11

      JediMasterYoda wrote:

       

      First off you wouldn't be able to use conventional weaponry in space because of the gravitational forces of space itself. The only weapons that could be used in space are energy lasers and beam weapons. By looking at the trailer already Call of Duty ****** up that realization.

      what ever your smoking, must be good stuff.

    • Re: Withouth Oxygen in Space would we see muzzle flash?
      zvers

      It's not because of gravity there Bill Nye. It's called oxygen. Gunpowder + spark needs flame to ignite, generating the pressure to send the projectile down the barrel. The question is, can bullet casings hold enough oxygen to provide enough air to cause a flame? Have you ever even fired real gun buddy? Obviously not. Well, your probably too young or some other factor.

       

      Wouldn't gravity stop a speeding commit or asteroid then too?

       

      I don't mean to harp on you man but it's very easy to get real info if you don't know instead of posting what you THINK is the right answer.

    • Re: Withouth Oxygen in Space would we see muzzle flash?
      Ex-inm8

      sorry "JEDI MASTER YODA" you watch to much star wars lol no offence

  • Re: Withouth Oxygen in Space would we see muzzle flash?
    WolfRidge

    The oxygen is contained within the gunpowder, so it would work, not the same as on earth but it would fire, I still think there would be a muzzle flash just probably less than normal.

  • Re: Withouth Oxygen in Space would we see muzzle flash?
    MASSBLASTER

    Yes you can use a gun in space. Yes it will fire. The Primer/Blast-cap fires from a CHEMICAL reaction. The real question is what about compression's?

     

    What Would Happen If You Shot a Gun In Space? | Can Guns Fire In Space? | Can I Shoot a Gun in Space? | LiveScience

     

     

     

    Sorry for the edit forgot to add the link Duhuh!

  • Re: Withouth Oxygen in Space would we see muzzle flash?
    robbierocket

    There would be no muzzle flash (when refering to muzzle flash as the fancy flash appearing outside of a gun barrel), simply because of there being no air (or oxygen) in that place. If a gun can be fired then by the very nature of the event there will be a minor burst of light within the barrel.

     

    As for the rest, it's arbritrary. The guns presented as being used in space could in theory have been adapted or optimised - as could be done for any environment. It's easier to think about the basics.

     

    Sound doesn't travel through a vacuum, light does but requires a mass to be absorbed and therefore for it's path to be visible.

     

    The laws of gravity apply everywhere, gravity is a universal constant. The force of gravity, however (which is where people are getting misunderstood) is dependent on mass (as per the laws) and so in space (by it's very name) there's not as much mass to pull on matter. If you're in deep space between solar systems (or even more incredibly between galaxies) you'll float around and feel no sense of pull or of "gravitation". If you're just outside the Earth's atmosphere, you'll basically head towards Earth, accelerating as you do so, until resisting forces slow you or combust you.

     

    I found this thread fun, unfortunately as with most discussion threads, the disagreements turn to slander. Perhaps, that though is part of the process of threads, communication and discussion on this forum.